G. Hare Stereo Tailbord Camera

G. Hare 26 Calthorp StTrained as a cabinet maker, George Hare entered his own camera making business circa 1857. He contributed several important innovations to 19th century camera design. Hare cameras were made to the highest standards. The mahogany wood is finished in a deep rich reddish brown. Dovetailed corner joints are perfectly fitted and every screw head is aligned like soldiers prepared for inspection. The sequentialy numbered Dallmeyer stereoscopic lenses incorporate wheel stops. The Dallmeyer Rapid Rectilinear mono lens included with this outfit has a matching set of numbered waterhouse stops. All the major wood components on the camera bear a number "1" as do both lens boards. I am not enough of a historian to properly interpret this. Is it a simple meaningless assembly number, or could this be the first camera made in a given year, or of a certain style? The lens serial numbers date this camera to circa 1875. Many cameras of this era bear no serial numbers at all. If it was a multi-digit number, I would just assume its a serial number and move on. The set also includes a pair of non-numbered plate holders and an example of Hare's Automatic Changing Box. Although not the first to make a daylight plate loader, Hare's device, patented in 1875, was an early example of the concept. One of the plate holders is equipped with a light tight interface to match the changing box.

 

George Hare Stereo Tailboard

 

George Hare Stereo Tailboard

 

George Hare Stereo Tailboard

 

George Hare Stereo Tailboard

 

George Hare Stereo Tailboard

 

George Hare Stereo Tailboard

 

George Hare Stereo Tailboard

 

George Hare Stereo Tailboard

 

George Hare Stereo Tailboard

 

G. Hare's Patent Automatic Changing Box

 

G. Hare's Patent Automatic Changing Box

 

George Hare Stereo Tailboard

 

Goerge Hare Stereo Camera Outfit

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